Category Archives: Uncategorized

April 2014

Mental Health First Aid is an evidence-based practice that provides the participant skills and knowledge to respond to someone in a mental health problem or crisis until the person receives professional help. Persons completing the 8-hour training will be certified mental health first-aiders for three years. The training also promotes acceptance and understanding of mental health needs and dispels stigma and fear. KANZA Mental Health and Guidance Center, Inc. offers training for adults and adults assisting youth. Persons interested in learning more can view the youtube video and can register for a course by contacting David Elsbury at 785-742-7113 or at delsbury@kanzamhgc.org or by visiting the MHFA website at http://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/cs.

March 2014 – KANZA launches new website.

Mental Health First Aid – KANZA is the recipient of a $1000 grant from Tower Foundation to support MHFA for Adults assisting Youth. This 8-hour interactive training is ideal for any adult who is supportive of youth age 11 years and up. KANZA also provides MHFA for adults. Interested persons in a training can contact David Elsbury 742-7113 or Jolene Lowe 742-2275 ext. 122.

HEALTH HOME PROGRAM – The State will begin its intensive care management program for persons, adults and youth, experiencing severe mental illness who have Kansas Medicaid, now known as KanCare in July. KANZA is preparing to become a Health Home provider and will work with other healthcare providers in the area to improve Medicaid consumers access and participation in their own health care. Stay tuned for more information.

Families in Recovery Training occurred at KANZA’S Community Services Building for about 25 staff and a representative of Pony Express NAMI on February 10th. It was provided by the KU’s School of Social Welfare. Family Psychoeducation is a practice that aims to achieve the best possible outcomes for adults diagnosed with a serious mental illness though the collaboration of professionals, consumers and family members.

August 2016 – AREA AUTHOR CONNIE BENT DEALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS IN NEW BOOK

Article taken from the Sabetha Herald on July 13, 2016

Submitted

Connie Bent knows that there are families coping with the mental illness or other sudden traumas experienced by a loved one Learning from personal experiences, Bent writes and publishes her first book “Hope, Courage & Triumph,” published by Xlibris. Set in the Midwest, Bent writes a story of love and freedom until a tragedy struck her family. Her husband Jerry suffered an illness, which affected not only her husband, but also the author herself and their children Louisa, Robert and Michelle. Bent thought she needed to write a memoir to help other people who are facing difficult problems. Although their family faced challenges and trauma, the author highlights in this book that love and determination can lead to success and triumph. “No matter how deep the pit of hell is, there is always hope,” Bent said.

Book Synopsis
Hope, Courage and Triumph is the story about one young widow’s journey through adventures and madness. Determination and love were the key elements of her being as she struggled to face the demons of her husband, Jerry’s illness. Tragedy was no stranger. No one knew what horrors lay behind the closed doors of her life yet hope drove her on. One evening after work Jerry held her in his arms confessing his love to her, suddenly a glaze covered his eyes and a look of hatred across his face. Looking at her, he began talking weird, about things she knew nothing of. He said, “I’ve heard that before. You know what I’m talking about.” Petrified, she couldn’t move. The glaze left his face as suddenly as it came, and moving towards her, he said, “I love you more than life itself.” Hope drove her as she struggled to pull him out of the pit of hell.

For more information about the book, readers may take a look on her website at http://authorwebservicesxl.net/US/737726.

About the Author
Connie Bent was born in Brookfield, Mo., in 1941 and grew up in a small town of the same state. She was a very determined person from the moment she was born. If she wanted something, she went after it. At 16, she married but became widow at age 25. She had quit school before her senior year, but knowing education was vital she wanted to graduate. During that time, mothers were not allowed to return to school. Bent convinced the school board to allow her to come back to school and graduate; she was the first mother to graduate from her school. Bent earned a master’s degree in clinical social work from Kansas University. She completed a family therapy externship at the Menninger Foundation in Topeka. For 30 years, she worked for KANZA Mental Health Center, providing therapy for people who suffered from mental illness. She specialized in providing family therapy and play therapy, which she felt were important to families who were coping with a mentally ill person. Bent has also published numerous newspaper articles dealing with mental illness.

September 2016 – SEPTEMBER IS SUICIDE PREVENTION MONTH 6

These are only a few of the warning signs that people may portray. For a complete list of warning signs please contact Kanza Mental Health and Guidance Center at 785-742-7113.

Suicide Awareness Month is a great to get certified in Mental Health First Aid. Kanza offers Mental Health First Aid for Youth and Adults. Classes can be modified to fit your organization’s schedule. Call Kanza today for more information.

Suicide Awareness Month is a great to get certified in Mental Health First Aid. Kanza offers Mental Health First Aid for Youth and Adults. Classes can be modified to fit your organization’s schedule. Call Kanza today for more information.

September is Suicide Prevention Month

As the school year begins and schedules are filled with practice, games, and projects, it is a good reminder of how we easily overlook the warning signs of suicide. September is Suicide Prevention Month; this month is designated to remind people of the warning signs of someone thinking about suicide. On the average fifty to seventy five percent of suicides give some warning signs to friends or family.

Therapist, Kailey Patton, LMFT, has created a list of things we can look for during our everyday lives to notice if someone is silently asking for help.

– Talking or wanting to kill oneself
– Sleeping too little or too much
– Acting anxious or agitated, behaving recklessly
– Suddenly happier, calmer after a period of depression
– Visiting or calling people to say goodbye

These are only a few of the warning signs that people may portray. For a complete list of warning signs please contact Kanza Mental Health and Guidance Center at 785-742-7113.

Suicide Awareness Month is a great to get certified in Mental Health First Aid. Kanza offers Mental Health First Aid for Youth and Adults. Classes can be modified to fit your organization’s schedule. Call Kanza today for more information.

Area Author Connie Bent Deals with Mental Illness in New Book

Article taken from the Sabetha Herald on July 13, 2016

Submitted
Connie Bent knows that there are families coping with the mental illness or other sudden traumas experienced by a loved one Learning from personal experiences, Bent writes and publishes her first book “Hope, Courage & Triumph,” published by Xlibris. Set in the Midwest, Bent writes a story of love and freedom until a tragedy struck her family. Her husband Jerry suffered an illness, which affected not only her husband, but also the author herself and their children Louisa, Robert and Michelle. Bent thought she needed to write a memoir to help other people who are facing difficult problems. Although their family faced challenges and trauma, the author highlights in this book that love and determination can lead to success and triumph. “No matter how deep the pit of hell is, there is always hope,” Bent said.

Book Synopsis
Hope, Courage and Triumph is the story about one young widow’s journey through adventures and madness. Determination and love were the key elements of her being as she struggled to face the demons of her husband, Jerry’s illness. Tragedy was no stranger. No one knew what horrors lay behind the closed doors of her life yet hope drove her on. One evening after work Jerry held her in his arms confessing his love to her, suddenly a glaze covered his eyes and a look of hatred across his face. Looking at her, he began talking weird, about things she knew nothing of. He said, “I’ve heard that before. You know what I’m talking about.” Petrified, she couldn’t move. The glaze left his face as suddenly as it came, and moving towards her, he said, “I love you more than life itself.” Hope drove her as she struggled to pull him out of the pit of hell.

For more information about the book, readers may take a look on her website at http://authorwebservicesxl.net/US/737726.

About the Author
Connie Bent was born in Brookfield, Mo., in 1941 and grew up in a small town of the same state. She was a very determined person from the moment she was born. If she wanted something, she went after it. At 16, she married but became widow at age 25. She had quit school before her senior year, but knowing education was vital she wanted to graduate. During that time, mothers were not allowed to return to school. Bent convinced the school board to allow her to come back to school and graduate; she was the first mother to graduate from her school. Bent earned a master’s degree in clinical social work from Kansas University. She completed a family therapy externship at the Menninger Foundation in Topeka. For 30 years, she worked for KANZA Mental Health Center, providing therapy for people who suffered from mental illness. She specialized in providing family therapy and play therapy, which she felt were important to families who were coping with a mentally ill person. Bent has also published numerous newspaper articles dealing with mental illness.

KDADS Secretary Visits Kanza Mental Health and Guidance Center

KDADS Secretary Visits Kanza Mental Health and Guidance Center
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Pictured Left to Right: Robert Wayman, Board President; Sec. Keck; David Elsbury, CEO; and Kyle Kessler, Exec. Director of ACMHCK

Interim Secretary Timothy Keck visited Kanza Mental Health and Guidance Center on Friday May 20th and was accompanied by Kyle Kessler, Executive Director of Association of Community Mental Health Centers, Inc. Secretary Keck met with David Elsbury, CEO, Robert Wayman, Kanza Board President and members of Kanza’s Executive Leadership Team to review the Center’s services and impact in the communities it serves. They also discussed the impact of KanCare and other changes to the mental health system, including the cuts to Medicaid provider rates recently announced by Gov. Brownback.

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Ribbon Cutting

Mirror, Inc and Kanza Mental Health and Guidance Center, Inc had a ribbon cutting Friday, March 11th at the Kanza Mental Health and Guidance Center’s Troy office. Mirror Inc. of Troy OP Substance Abuse Counselor, Donna Jensen MS, LAC, will be utilizing an office to provide counseling services for clients with substance use disorders for both adults and juveniles resulting from a partnership between Kanza and Mirror to bring substance use disorder services to this area. In addition to providing counseling services, Mirror Inc. also provides services for Drug and Alcohol Assessments and the 8 hour Alcohol Drug Information School (ADIS) class in both Doniphan County and Brown County.
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Pictured Left to Right: Richard Gilchrist, Donna Jensen, Robert Wayman, Craig Mosher, Marty Allen, J.D. Euler, David Elsbury.

Kanza has generously donated $1000 of the funds they receive from Doniphan County Liquor Tax money to assist clients in need of substance abuse services who meet financial criteria to pay for substance abuse services.

Mrs Jensen will be in the Troy office on Fridays or by appointment. To make an appointment with Mrs. Jensen, call 785-742-7551 ext. 106. For more information on Kanza services, contact the Main Office at 785-741-7113.

Kanza’s Troy office is located at 134 East Walnut, on the north side of the square. The building was purchased from Morrill and Janes Bank and Trust in 2014. Kanza also uses the building to provide mental health services for adults and children through outpatient therapy and mental health rehabilitation services to residents of Doniphan County.

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Kick Butts Day

Did you know that over 400,000 people die from a tobbacco related disease in the United States every year? March is Tobacco-Free Media Month, where organizations are offering education and support to quit smoking on social media. The Center for Disease Control is hosting an online Facebook event to help people who are ready to quit smoking. You simply RSVP to the event and join a supportive community who will post daily to keep you motivated on your path to quitting. The page also gives helpful tips on how to stop smoking. Visit 30 Smokefree days to RSVP today! This event is open to everyone!!
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To help educate youth and teens on the dangers of smoking, March 16th will be named “KICK BUTTS DAY.” Please help us in the fight with smoking by talking to your children about the dangers and diseases that go along with smoking. Kids are never too young to learn to say NO to smoking.

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Jackson County Challenge

Jackson County accepted and accomplished Kanza’s Jackson County Challenge. Through the generous contributions of many businesses and residents in Jackson County, Kanza was able to reach their $10,000 goal by the deadline of December 31, 2015. This money will be matched by a donor to help start the renovation process of the Moser Building in Holton.
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Denison State Bank and the family of Jim and Mary Lou Birkbeck jumped right in to start the challenge by each donating $1,000. Another great push came when the Prairie Band Potawatomie Nation awarded Kanza a $5,000 charitable grant.
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“The Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation is excited to contribute to KANZA, knowing our donation helped to reach the Jackson County Challenge. The Nation looks forward to the services that will be available to the Northeast Kansas Community once the building is renovated.” – Camilla Chouteau, Tribal Council Secretary

The positive response from the community encouraged Kanza, especially staff member Linda Grimm, to keep knocking on doors to spread the word of the challenge. The Holton Wal-Mart made the final donation of $1,350 to get Kanza to the $10,000 mark. Without these generous donors, the Jackson County Challenge would not have been the success it has been.

Not only did the Jackson County Challenge help raise money for the Center, but it gave an opportunity for David Elsbury and Foundation Board member, Roger Coverdale, to speak to local businesses, school board members, and government officials about the goal of the Jackson County Challenge as well as what Kanza offers the community as a whole.

The money from the Jackson County Challenge will support Kanza starting renovations of the Moser building to accomplish the goal of having all providers located in one building. It will also help to expand services to the area. Kanza will continue to work with the Jackson County Commission and others to identify ways to raise money to continue with the renovations as the projected cost is around $750,000.

Kanza Mental Health and Guidance Center would like to thank everyone who supported Kanza through the Jackson County Challenge. We are happy to be able to expand our services as well as continue to “Build Hope For A Better Tomorrow.”

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