Latest News

February 2015

Mental Health First Aid a growing success says National Council on Behavioral Healthcare. “Now with more than 6,300 instructors, the program has spread to all 50 states. Since 2008, more than 300,000 people in the U.S. have completed the Mental Health First Aid course to learn how to help youth and adults with mental health and substance use concerns connect to care in their communities.” Since May of 2010 Kanza has delivered 16 trainings and trained 248 persons in our four county area. Courses have been held in all four counties. Our post-training evaluation scores show an approval rating of 4.38 on a five point scale. Kanza’s certified adult and youth MHFA trainers are Jolene Lowe, CBS Assistant Director and David Elsbury, CEO. Kanza has been asked to join with KDADS and the Kansas Department of Education to provide MHFA training for staff of the schools in Brown County. If you are interested in scheduling a class, please contact David Elsbury at 785-742-7113.

November 2014

KANZA is proud to be included as one of eight local non-profit agencies Thrivent Financial is choosing to support in its second annual “Championing Charities” events in 2015. Hiawatha’s event will occur Sunday, November 16th from 11:30-2:30 pm during the Jingle Bell Ride. Championing Charities will be located on the square at PRTS 200 Oregon St. Sabetha’s event will occur on Friday, November 28th from 4:30 – 7:30 pm during the Window Opening event at the Community Center 1116 Main Street. Please join your friends at KANZA at this Christmas fundraiser event. There will be live music, a coat drive and food and fun. You can support the KANZA Mental Health Foundation and the Center’s mission of HOPE FOR A BETTER TOMORROW with your tax deductible donation. Click Here to View Flyers: Hiawatha Flyer and Sabetha Flyer

May 2014

KANZA is pleased to announce that it has purchased its first building in Doniphan County to house our agency and its services to the citizens of Doniphan County. The new facility is approximately 1400 square feet of usable office space and will provide a much improved location for the Center’s clinical services in Doniphan County. It is located at 134 E. Walnut St. on the north side of the Troy town square. Services began at this site on April 15th, 2014.
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April 2014

Mental Health First Aid is an evidence-based practice that provides the participant skills and knowledge to respond to someone in a mental health problem or crisis until the person receives professional help. Persons completing the 8-hour training will be certified mental health first-aiders for three years. The training also promotes acceptance and understanding of mental health needs and dispels stigma and fear. KANZA Mental Health and Guidance Center, Inc. offers training for adults and adults assisting youth. Persons interested in learning more can view the youtube video and can register for a course by contacting David Elsbury at 785-742-7113 or at delsbury@kanzamhgc.org or by visiting the MHFA website at http://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/cs.

March 2014 – KANZA launches new website.

Mental Health First Aid – KANZA is the recipient of a $1000 grant from Tower Foundation to support MHFA for Adults assisting Youth. This 8-hour interactive training is ideal for any adult who is supportive of youth age 11 years and up. KANZA also provides MHFA for adults. Interested persons in a training can contact David Elsbury 742-7113 or Jolene Lowe 742-2275 ext. 122.

HEALTH HOME PROGRAM – The State will begin its intensive care management program for persons, adults and youth, experiencing severe mental illness who have Kansas Medicaid, now known as KanCare in July. KANZA is preparing to become a Health Home provider and will work with other healthcare providers in the area to improve Medicaid consumers access and participation in their own health care. Stay tuned for more information.

Families in Recovery Training occurred at KANZA’S Community Services Building for about 25 staff and a representative of Pony Express NAMI on February 10th. It was provided by the KU’s School of Social Welfare. Family Psychoeducation is a practice that aims to achieve the best possible outcomes for adults diagnosed with a serious mental illness though the collaboration of professionals, consumers and family members.

August 2016 – AREA AUTHOR CONNIE BENT DEALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS IN NEW BOOK

Article taken from the Sabetha Herald on July 13, 2016

Submitted

Connie Bent knows that there are families coping with the mental illness or other sudden traumas experienced by a loved one Learning from personal experiences, Bent writes and publishes her first book “Hope, Courage & Triumph,” published by Xlibris. Set in the Midwest, Bent writes a story of love and freedom until a tragedy struck her family. Her husband Jerry suffered an illness, which affected not only her husband, but also the author herself and their children Louisa, Robert and Michelle. Bent thought she needed to write a memoir to help other people who are facing difficult problems. Although their family faced challenges and trauma, the author highlights in this book that love and determination can lead to success and triumph. “No matter how deep the pit of hell is, there is always hope,” Bent said.

Book Synopsis
Hope, Courage and Triumph is the story about one young widow’s journey through adventures and madness. Determination and love were the key elements of her being as she struggled to face the demons of her husband, Jerry’s illness. Tragedy was no stranger. No one knew what horrors lay behind the closed doors of her life yet hope drove her on. One evening after work Jerry held her in his arms confessing his love to her, suddenly a glaze covered his eyes and a look of hatred across his face. Looking at her, he began talking weird, about things she knew nothing of. He said, “I’ve heard that before. You know what I’m talking about.” Petrified, she couldn’t move. The glaze left his face as suddenly as it came, and moving towards her, he said, “I love you more than life itself.” Hope drove her as she struggled to pull him out of the pit of hell.

For more information about the book, readers may take a look on her website at http://authorwebservicesxl.net/US/737726.

About the Author
Connie Bent was born in Brookfield, Mo., in 1941 and grew up in a small town of the same state. She was a very determined person from the moment she was born. If she wanted something, she went after it. At 16, she married but became widow at age 25. She had quit school before her senior year, but knowing education was vital she wanted to graduate. During that time, mothers were not allowed to return to school. Bent convinced the school board to allow her to come back to school and graduate; she was the first mother to graduate from her school. Bent earned a master’s degree in clinical social work from Kansas University. She completed a family therapy externship at the Menninger Foundation in Topeka. For 30 years, she worked for KANZA Mental Health Center, providing therapy for people who suffered from mental illness. She specialized in providing family therapy and play therapy, which she felt were important to families who were coping with a mentally ill person. Bent has also published numerous newspaper articles dealing with mental illness.

September 2016 – SEPTEMBER IS SUICIDE PREVENTION MONTH 6

These are only a few of the warning signs that people may portray. For a complete list of warning signs please contact Kanza Mental Health and Guidance Center at 785-742-7113.

Suicide Awareness Month is a great to get certified in Mental Health First Aid. Kanza offers Mental Health First Aid for Youth and Adults. Classes can be modified to fit your organization’s schedule. Call Kanza today for more information.

Suicide Awareness Month is a great to get certified in Mental Health First Aid. Kanza offers Mental Health First Aid for Youth and Adults. Classes can be modified to fit your organization’s schedule. Call Kanza today for more information.

September is Suicide Prevention Month

As the school year begins and schedules are filled with practice, games, and projects, it is a good reminder of how we easily overlook the warning signs of suicide. September is Suicide Prevention Month; this month is designated to remind people of the warning signs of someone thinking about suicide. On the average fifty to seventy five percent of suicides give some warning signs to friends or family.

Therapist, Kailey Patton, LMFT, has created a list of things we can look for during our everyday lives to notice if someone is silently asking for help.

– Talking or wanting to kill oneself
– Sleeping too little or too much
– Acting anxious or agitated, behaving recklessly
– Suddenly happier, calmer after a period of depression
– Visiting or calling people to say goodbye

These are only a few of the warning signs that people may portray. For a complete list of warning signs please contact Kanza Mental Health and Guidance Center at 785-742-7113.

Suicide Awareness Month is a great to get certified in Mental Health First Aid. Kanza offers Mental Health First Aid for Youth and Adults. Classes can be modified to fit your organization’s schedule. Call Kanza today for more information.

Area Author Connie Bent Deals with Mental Illness in New Book

Article taken from the Sabetha Herald on July 13, 2016

Submitted
Connie Bent knows that there are families coping with the mental illness or other sudden traumas experienced by a loved one Learning from personal experiences, Bent writes and publishes her first book “Hope, Courage & Triumph,” published by Xlibris. Set in the Midwest, Bent writes a story of love and freedom until a tragedy struck her family. Her husband Jerry suffered an illness, which affected not only her husband, but also the author herself and their children Louisa, Robert and Michelle. Bent thought she needed to write a memoir to help other people who are facing difficult problems. Although their family faced challenges and trauma, the author highlights in this book that love and determination can lead to success and triumph. “No matter how deep the pit of hell is, there is always hope,” Bent said.

Book Synopsis
Hope, Courage and Triumph is the story about one young widow’s journey through adventures and madness. Determination and love were the key elements of her being as she struggled to face the demons of her husband, Jerry’s illness. Tragedy was no stranger. No one knew what horrors lay behind the closed doors of her life yet hope drove her on. One evening after work Jerry held her in his arms confessing his love to her, suddenly a glaze covered his eyes and a look of hatred across his face. Looking at her, he began talking weird, about things she knew nothing of. He said, “I’ve heard that before. You know what I’m talking about.” Petrified, she couldn’t move. The glaze left his face as suddenly as it came, and moving towards her, he said, “I love you more than life itself.” Hope drove her as she struggled to pull him out of the pit of hell.

For more information about the book, readers may take a look on her website at http://authorwebservicesxl.net/US/737726.

About the Author
Connie Bent was born in Brookfield, Mo., in 1941 and grew up in a small town of the same state. She was a very determined person from the moment she was born. If she wanted something, she went after it. At 16, she married but became widow at age 25. She had quit school before her senior year, but knowing education was vital she wanted to graduate. During that time, mothers were not allowed to return to school. Bent convinced the school board to allow her to come back to school and graduate; she was the first mother to graduate from her school. Bent earned a master’s degree in clinical social work from Kansas University. She completed a family therapy externship at the Menninger Foundation in Topeka. For 30 years, she worked for KANZA Mental Health Center, providing therapy for people who suffered from mental illness. She specialized in providing family therapy and play therapy, which she felt were important to families who were coping with a mentally ill person. Bent has also published numerous newspaper articles dealing with mental illness.

Media Plays on Mental Illness as Violent When Studies Show the Opposite

A study done by John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows that, “Nearly four in 10 news stories about mental illness analyzed by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers connect mental illness with violent behavior toward others, even though less than five percent of violence in the United States is directly related to mental illness.” The study comments on the continued stigma the media puts on mental illness to its millions of viewers. This stigma makes those with a mental illness uncomfortable to talk about it or even get help, even though the statics show that 50% of the population will have a mental illness over their lifetime.

READ MORE ON THIS STUDY

For more information on mental illness contact David Elsbury, CEO at 785-742-7113 or attend a Mental Health First Aid class in your area.